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The Untold Tales of Camiguin Island | Why the Jesuit abandoned the Camiguin Mission

November 17, 2020

In 1596, the Jesuits obtained a Sede Vacante, a license issued by Governor General Francisco de Tello de Guzman through a Patronato Real to do mission work along the Butuan River and Camiguin (Mallari,1995). In 1599, the missionades  founded Guinsiliban, in the south east of the island: a strategic site, a natural lookout from where they could observe the sea passage of the southern pirates. It eventually became the oldest town in Camiguin. Camiguin from afar by Jameson Go (through Queenie Anne Gumiran, The Queens Escape.com, Camiguin DIY Travel Guide 2020 (Itinerary + Budget).   For almost twenty years, these friars came and went between the island of Cebú and that of Mindanao, using Camiguin as a stopover on their long journeys (Pedro Chirino, History of the Philippine Province of the Society of Jesus. Vol II Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila Press, 2011). Two Manobos and a Bukidnon (The Field Museum, Chicago, Worcester, 30457, Bk. 233, 1909 or 1910)   There they tried to establish the first Spanish village on the island.  But the project did not succeed. The Manobo who lived in that part of the island did not trust the words of these strange-looking babaylan.   But this was not the only difficulty that the Jesuit friars encountered. For the southern pirates, Guinsiliban was their entry point of arrival to Camiguin. A Sulu Illanoan (Iranun) pirate from Tampassook (modern Sabah), Borneo (Frank Marryat)   These incursions, which until then had been sporadic, increased as Christian influence grew in the area. It was a fight for trade in those seas. When traders of the southern sultanates such as Sulu, Maguindanao, and Lanao began to lose the monopoly they had enjoyed until then, they  shifted to the slave trade. Piraguas piratas de los Joloanos c.1850. A depiction of garay warships used by Sulu pirates.   The trade allowed them to sell the slaves not only in their own sultanates but also to Dutch settlers who had established themselves in the East Indies. (Domingo M. Non. “Moro Piracy During The Spanish Period And Its Impact” in Southeastern Asian Studies (1993) 30, 4.) During those first years of the seventeenth century, and given the Manobo’s rejection, Guinsiliban became too unstable for what the Jesuit friars had in mind. The Jesuits, thus, left shortly after. All these made it very difficult for the Jesuits to build any tangible relics. Most researchers believe the Guinsiliban watch tower may have been built by the Augustinian Recollects after their arrival in Camiguin on 1622 as part of a bigger construction (church or fortress). Its design and construction materials are the same that those in Catarman (built by the Agustinians). Moro Watch Tower in Guinsiliban (courtesy of Jorie Valcorza)   However, there appears to be an academic consensus that the slave raids were the main reason why the Spanish Jesuits abandoned their Camiguin mission in Guinsiliban. The sultanates had the trade monopoly on the southern seas. Once the Europeans started to sail in those waters and occupy its territories (Dutch East Indies or present day Indonesia, and the Spanish occupation of the Philippine Archipelago), the more intense and frequent were the Moro/pirate raids. Andrés Narros Lluch on a historical guide visit to Guiob Church, Catarman   “It was a way to resist to the new foreign powers in the area,” said Social and Cultural Anthropologist Dr. Andrés Narros Lluch whose recently published a book “The Untold Stories of Camiguin Island” by the Xavier University Press, seeks to fill such gaps in the island’s history. The pirates came into the Visayas to kidnap people and sell them as slaves to the Dutch East Indies as well as in their own sultanates, he added. “As a matter of fact, according to Fernando Zialcita, in the language of Maranao traders, the word Bisaya means slave. Similarly, Domingo Non, cites the word Lanun (Lanao) which is used in the north and west of Borneo to refer to pirates,” Lluch said. Cosas Notables   The Untold Tales of Camiguin Island is the first research on Camiguin which is based on the archives of Augustinian Recollects and their Cosas Notables that seeks to correlate the manuscripts with archival findings and the island’s oral histories. Lluch focused each chapter on an important historical event few Camiguingnons and scholars are aware of such as Kimigin (about the first inhabitants of the island, the Manobo, the followers of Datu Migin); Punta Pasil (the first Christian religious center on the island);  Datu Mehong the legend of a local leader, healer and warrior whose message was silenced); and The Old Volcano (what happened before and after the 1871 volcanic eruption). Kilaha Foundation   Lluch co-founded the Kilaha Foundation in 2015 to document and support local culture and identity, as well as preserve the fascinating biodiversity of Camiguin. He is currently an affiliated researcher at Research Institute of Mindanao Culture (RIMCU) at Xavier University (Ateneo de Cagayan). He earned his PhD in Social and Cultural Anthropology from the Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED). He has done field work as an aid worker and social researcher in Southeast Asia, Central Asia, Central America, South America, East Africa, and Europe for twenty years. He belonged to the Southeast Asia Department at the School of Oriental and African Studies (2011–2012), was guest researcher in the Department of Anthropology at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and associate researcher in the Department of Anthropology at the University of the Philippines Manila (2012–2014).   He has previously published La comedia de la cooperación internacional: historias etnográficas del desarrollo en la isla de Camiguín (Catarata, 2016) and currently commutes between Spain and Brussels, where he works at ODS as Senior Evaluator. The Untold Stories of Camiguin Island by Andres Narros Lluch   More details about The Untold Stories of Camiguin Island from the Xavier University webpage here.

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The Japanese Surrender in Malaybalay, Bukidnon

November 13, 2020

The 8th of September 2020 came and went with nary a fanfare, perhaps adding to further proof that the Second World War is now all but forgotten in the minds of most Filipinos. However, that date should be remembered by Filipinos in Mindanao because it marked the 75th Anniversary of the official end of hostilities on the island between the Imperial Japanese Army (IJA) and the Allied Forces. Three quarters of a century earlier on 08 September 1945 the Japanese 35th Army signed the terms of unconditional surrender at Camp Impalambong, Malaybalay, Bukidnon. Brig Gen Joseph Hutchinson & Lt Gen Gyokasu Moruzumi signing the  Surrender Document at Malaybalay, Bukidnon. (courtesy of Mrs. Marion Hess, (widow of Fredrick W. Hess, Jr.) as President of the  124th Infantry Regiment Association & posted by The History Crier, a publication of IndianaMilitary.org   Signing on behalf of the Imperial Japanese Army was Lieutenant General Gyokasu Morozumi, acting commanding general of the IJA 35th Army and commanding general of the 30th Panther (Leopard, in other reports) Division. Signing on behalf of the Allied Forces was Brig. Gen. Joseph C. Hutchinson, commanding general of the 31st Infantry Division (AUS). Under the terms of the unconditional surrender, Morozumi surrendered all the officers and men, arms, military equipment, records and supplies under his command to Hutchinson in his capacity as commanding general, 31st Infantry Division (AUS). The terms further stipulated that Morozumi would use all means in his possession to secure as early as possible the assembly of all troops under his command within the Reception Centers established by the US Army, and take action under Hutchinson’s direction to liaison with units and individuals who had not yet surrendered at that point. Not the least, Morozumi committed to report all known locations of explosives and mines, both land and water, whose presence constitute a hazard to life and property. Surrender of Japanese Forces in the Philippines 03 September 1945 in Baguio, Luzon. (U.S. Army Signal Corps photograph, Public Domain) It should be noted that the surrender of Japanese troops in Mindanao came five days after the official surrender of Japanese forces in the Philippines on 03 September 1945 and six days after the official Japanese surrender in Tokyo Bay. Like the USAFFE surrender in Mindanao on 10 May 1942, the delay was due to the time it took for the official orders to trickle down the south from Manila. Photos provided to the December 2002, Vol. 8  No. 12 issue of The History Crier, a publication of IndianaMilitary.org, by Mrs. Marion Hess, (widow of Fredrick W. Hess, Jr.) in her capacity as President of the  124th Infantry Regiment Association, provide some interesting sidelights to the surrender ceremony. The Battle of Colgan Woods. A Florida National Guard Painting by Jackson Walker. Mindanao, Philippine Islands, 6 May 1945. The battle was the most costly struggle endured by the 124th Infantry Regiment during World War II. On the first day of battle (May 6) Father Thomas A. Colgan was killed while bringing relief and last rites to men of the 124th. Chaplain Colgan was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Service Cross and the battle and woods were named in his memory. (Amelia Island  Museum of History)   The 124th Regiment was one of the three organic infantry regiments of the 31st Division, along with the 155th and 167th. The unit saw intense fighting on the island of Mindanao in the Philippines in 1945, especially in the Battle of Colgan Woods, named after Father Thomas Colgan, the Regimental Chaplain, who was killed in action while assisting wounded. On 5 June, Corporal Harry R. Harr was killed covering a Japanese grenade with his body to save those around him. For this action, he was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor. Japanese Soldiers killed by the 124th Infantry Regiment, Mindanao Island, 1945 (cropped)   Lacking artillery support and facing an entrenched opponent, the 124th advanced for six days. The unit survived two banzai charges and inflicted heavy casualties on the Japanese. In the fighting, the 124th suffered 69 killed and 177 wounded.  The regiment was inactivated 16 December 1945 at Camp Stoneman, California. Pre-War Camp Impalambong, Malaybalay now Camp Osito D. Bahian (NARA)   Camp Osito D Bahian Welcome & Col. Osito D. Bahian bust plaque The surrender rites were held in a makeshift thatched roof building at Camp Impalambong in  Malaybalay, which is now Camp Osito D. Bahian, headquarters of the Philippine Army’s 403rd “Peacemaker” Brigade. Lt Gen. Gyokasu Morozumi signs the surrender document while his interpreter looks over his shoulder and Brig. Gen. Joseph C. Hutchinson and staff look on. (courtesy of Mrs. Marion Hess, (widow of Fredrick W. Hess, Jr.) as President of the  124th Infantry Regiment Association & posted by The History Crier, a publication of IndianaMilitary.org   According to the notes scribbled on the photo of the signing, Morozumi had an interpreter at his side to ostensibly explain to him the terms of the surrender (the surrender document was written in both English and Japanese characters) and also assure both documents were correct in form and substance. Japanese Lt. Gen. Morozumi signs the surrender document as 31st Infantry Dixie Division  CG Joseph C. Hutchinson and staff look on Sept. 8, 1945 at Camp Impalambong, Malaybalay  (courtesy of Mrs. Marion Hess, (widow of Fredrick W. Hess, Jr.) as President of the  124th Infantry Regiment Association & posted by The History Crier, a publication of IndianaMilitary.org   On the other hand, Hutchison looks like he has his entire staff and officers witnessing the signing behind him, while Morozumi only had his interpreter beside him. Col. Hal Hardenbergh escorts IJA 35th Army CG  Gyokasu Morozumi between ranks of the 31st Division Headquarters, Special Troops after the surrender at Malaybalay (courtesy of Mrs. Marion Hess, (widow of Fredrick W. Hess, Jr.) as President of the  124th Infantry Regiment Association & posted by The History Crier, a publication of IndianaMilitary.org   Another photo shows Morozumi escorted by Col. Hal Hardenbergh between the ranks of the 31st Headquarters, Special Troops after the signing. The caption said Hardenbergh hand-picked the troops so that all were 6 feet tall or taller so they would tower over the Japanese general! Hutchison was one of the few brigadier generals in the National Guard serving in the South Pacific War Theatre. His 21 months in combat ended Sept. 8, 1945, when he accepted the surrender of the Japanese 35th Army at Mindanao, in the Philippine Islands. His World War II military honors include the Silver Star, the Bronze Star and the Legion of Merit. He retired as a lieutenant general in the National Guard in 1952. Lt. Gen. Gyokasu Morozumi about to take a ride on a US L-4 Grasshopper(US Army)   On the other hand, Morozumi was a graduate of the Imperial Japanese Army Academy and served with the IJA 58th Infantry Regiment during the tail end of the Russo-Japanese War. He later served as battalion commander IJA 59th Infantry Regiment, IJA 1st Infantry Regiment, IJA 29th Infantry Regiment and IJA 65th Infantry Regiments and as commander of the Hongo Regimental District. The IJA 65th Fukushima Regiment was one of the units at the Battle of Nanking in 1937 during the Second Sino-Japanese War and was accused of the massacre of prisoners of war following the battle's end. Morozumi was promoted to major general and assigned to the IJA 39th Division, which was still engaged in operations on the Chinese mainland, including the Battle of Zaoyang–Yichang and the Central Hubei Operation. In 1943, he became commander of the IJA 5th Depot Division In March 1944, Morozumi was promoted to lieutenant general and was given command of the IJA 30th Division, a garrison force based in Korea. However, in November of the same year, the IJA 30th Division was ordered to the Philippines and Morozumi was based at Surigao in northeastern Mindanao under the overall command of the IJA 35th Army. General Sosaku Suzuki, Commanding General, IJA 35th Army (1891-1945)   After General Sosaku Suzuki, commander of the IJA 35th Army transferred to Leyte  to coordinate defenses against the invading Allies in the Battle of Leyte, Morozumi was left in command with the defenses of the island of Mindanao, which soon came under attack by the American 24th, 31st, and 40th Infantry Divisions and the Philippine Commonwealth military including local resistance fighters. Most of his division was fed into the defense of Leyte in October to November 1944. Assembly of surrendered Japanese troops near the bank of Pulangui river at Lumbo or Poblacion Valencia (NARA)   By April 1945, his forces were split and isolated. Morozumi was officially confirmed as commander of the IJA 35th Army after Suzuki was killed in battle on April 19th. However, in practice, Morozumi largely ignored his appointment, knowing that communications were too poor to permit any real supervision of the other elements under his nominal command. He was forced to surrender Mindanao by the war's end. Surrendered Japanese troops being transported to Cagayan for shipping back to Japan somewhere  in Damay, close to Culaman Bridge in San Vicente, Sumilao (NARA)   The 31st Infantry Division ("Dixie") was an infantry division of the United States Army National Guard, active almost continuously from 1917 to 1968. 31st Dixie Division Memorial   Organized in 1917 during World War I from the national guardsmen of Alabama, Florida, and Georgia, the division deployed to France in September 1918, arriving weeks before the Armistice of 11 November that ended the war. In France, it was reduced to a cadre and most of its troops used to provide replacements for units already in France. It returned to the United States in December and was demobilized in January 1919. The 31st was reorganized in 1923 with national guardsmen from Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi. It was mobilized in 1940 during World War II, and spent several years training in the United States. In 1944 it was sent to the South-West Pacific Area, fighting in the New Guinea campaign and in the Battle of Mindanao. On 22 April 1945, the 31st Infantry Division landed on Mindanao to take part in the liberation of the Philippines, along with units of the 24th and later 40th Divisions. Moving up the Sayre Highway and driving down the Kibawe-Talomo trail, fighting in knee-deep mud and through torrential rains, the 31st with the help of Filipino guerrillas forced the enemy to withdraw into the interior and blocked off other Japanese in the Davao area. After the end of the war the division was demobilized in December 1945. -30- References 1.    Surrender photos from The History Crier, December 2002, Vol. 8 no. 12, a publication of the IndianaMilitary.org, a privately owned and funded organization dedicated to the preservation of Indiana Military History. West, James D., Editor 2.       Alabama Department of Archives and History (1959). Alabama Official and Statistical Register, 1959. Alexander City, Alabama: Outlook Publishing. 3.       The Army Almanac: A Book of Facts Concerning the Army of the United States U.S. Government Printing Office, 1950 reproduced at CMH. 4.       After-Action Report and G-3 Journal, 31st Infantry Division, NARA. 5.       Clay, Steven E. (2010). US Army Order of Battle 1919–1941 (PDF). 1: The Arms: Major Commands and Infantry Organizations. Fort Leavenworth, Kansas: Combat Studies Institute Press. ISBN 9781780399164. 6.       Historical Section, Army War College (1931). Order of Battle of the United States Land Forces in the World War; American Expeditionary Forces; Divisions (PDF) (Reprint, 1988 ed.). Washington: Government Printing Office. History of the 31st Infantry Division in training and combat, 1940–1945. Army & Navy Publishing Company. 1946. Isby, David C.; Kamps, Charles T. (1985). Armies of NATO's Central Front. Jane's Information Group. ISBN 0-7106-0341-X. Mississippi Secretary of State (1964). Mississippi Official and Statistical Register, 1960–1964. Jackson: State of Mississippi. Robert Ross Smith (1991). US Army in World War II, War in the Pacific, Triumph in the Philippines. Washington, D.C.: Center of Military History, United States Army. Wilson, John B. (1998). Maneuver and Firepower: The Evolution of Divisions and Separate Brigades (PDF). Washington, D.C.: Center for Military History, U.S. Army. ISBN 0-16-049571-7. Wilson, John B. (1999). Armies, Corps, Divisions, and Separate Brigades (PDF). Washington, D.C.: Center for Military History, U.S. Army. ISBN 0-16-049994-1. "Lineage and Honors 124th Infantry Regiment". U.S. Army Center of Military History. "Southern Philippines". The U.S. Army Campaigns of World War II. The U.S. Army Center of Military History.  Gary Taylor of The Sentinel Staff, The Orlando Sentinel

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Mondelez Philippines Promotes Eating with Attention and Intention 

November 12, 2020

Philippines – November 10, 2020 – As part of the world’s leading snacks company, Mondelez Philippines aims to empower people to snack right. This means providing the right snack, for the right moment and made the right way. It also means promoting mindful snacking – or the practice of being in the moment and eating with attention and intention. Recently the Company shared how it is promoting Mindful Snacking with one of its biggest brands, Tang.  Snacking is much more than eating between meals  All over the world, snacking is growing. The lines between snacking and meals is blurring. Mondelez Philippines knows that consumers don’t want to have to choose between snacking and eating right. These days, snacks mean more than just something you eat in-between meals. According to a 2019 State of Snacking survey which the Company undertook, three trends are influencing snacking all over the world: (1) Snacking is eclipsing meals globally as appetites for smaller bites grows. (2) Snacking offers bite-sized rituals connecting us to culture and community and (3) Snacks nourish body, mind, and soul; with indulgence remaining a priority. Mindful Snacking: Eating with Attention + Intention  Seeing these trends in snacking, Mondelez Philippines takes it upon itself to not only make delicious snacks for consumers, but to also promote Mindful Snacking to ensure wellbeing. Mindful Snacking is an approach to eating with attention and intention.  ‘Attention’ means being conscious of what you want to eat, why you’re eating, and how it makes you feel. So, you don’t have to choose between snacking and eating right for the moment. Experts have found that Mindful Snacking has benefits: Focusing on the present moment can help you discover a more satisfying and positive snacking experience and makes you less likely to binge or overeat.    ‘Intention’ means choosing the right snacks for your needs. To support this, Mondelez Philippines works to provide consumers easy access to the right snacks, for the right moment, and made the right way. Like Tang, which offers affordable nutrition and refreshment for the entire family.  Snack Mindfully with Tang  As the #1 Powdered Beverage brand in the Philippines, Tang aims to become Moms’ ally in providing the right snack for moms to protect her children and prepare them for a brighter future. Tang has been in the Philippines since 1972, with 48 years of refreshing Moms and their families. It provides a truly delicious and nourishing drink for the family and offers the widest portfolio of 21 fruit-flavored beverages.  Tang is the right snack, containing 100% of your family’s Vitamin C requirements with every glass. Vitamin C is that much more important for children to have these days, with the prevalence of COVID-19 and other diseases. Tang aims to be Moms’ ally in providing not only refreshment and deliciousness, but also affordable nutrition. With only P18 per pack, which makes 5 glasses of beverage, Mom can provide her family with nutrition, protection and refreshment.  This deeply rooted presence in Filipino’s lives also allows Tang to provide for a wide variety of consumer needs – for the right moment. This includes the creation of Tang Sweet Orange – a flavor that’s only available in Mindanao. It is Mas Lami, or made more delicious for the taste preferences of our different regions in the country.  As a leader in the powdered beverage category, Tang works to set the standard for high quality and product benefits – it is made the right way. The brand stands by its promise to Moms, to provide only wholesome nutrition. Tang is also made with real fruit extracts and has no artificial flavors. As a trusted company, it also abides by all government regulations and is a responsible corporate citizen, supporting community programs that help empower children and their community.   Snack Mindfully with Tang and Mondelez Philippines, with the right snacks, for the right moment, and made the right way.   About Mondelēz International Mondelēz International, Inc. (NASDAQ: MDLZ) empowers people to snack right in over 150 countries around the world. With 2019 net revenues of approximately $26 billion, MDLZ is leading the future of snacking with iconic global and local brands such as OREO, belVita and LU biscuits; Cadbury Dairy Milk, Milka and Toblerone chocolate; Sour Patch Kids candy and Trident gum. Mondelēz International is a proud member of the Standard and Poor’s 500, Nasdaq 100 and Dow Jones Sustainability Index. Visit www.mondelezinternational.com or follow the company on Twitter at www.twitter.com/MDLZ. About Mondelez Philippines  Mondelez Philippines Inc. has been providing consumers with delicious snack products for the past 57 years - since 1963. Its product portfolio includes Tang powdered beverages, Eden cheese, mayonnaise and sandwich spread, Cheez Whiz spread, Oreo cookies, Tiger energy biscuits, belVita breakfast biscuits, as well as Toblerone and Cadbury Dairy Milk chocolates. The company employs about 450 people in the Philippines, with a manufacturing facility in Parañaque City. Visit https://ph.mondelezinternational.com/home. 

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The Historical Origin of the name Camiguin

November 12, 2020

Residents and visitors to this beautiful isle off the northern coast of Mindanao have heard many versions of how its mysterious name came about, but now a book that delves into the historical origins of the its name at last gives its version a plausible leg to stand on. In his paper co-authored with the late Dr. Erlinda Burton  Surfacing the Untold Stories of Camiguin Island published in Vol. XXXIX of the Xavier University’s Kinaadman Journal, Social and Cultural Anthropologist Dr. Andrés Narros Lluch said the name originated with the Proto Northern Manobo who first migrated to the island. Kinaadman Journal  Vol. 39   According to archaeological and linguistic studies, a legend on the origin of the people in Camiguin tells of a certain leader/chieftain named Migin who settled down with his people on the southeastern part of the island. The prefix Ki in the word Kinamigin means territory, thus, the word Kimigin means the land of Migin. When Boholanos migrated to the island, its name was translated to Bisaya as Kamigin, in which the prefix ka had the  same meaning. When the Spanish missionaries arrived on the island in the 16th century, they translated its name following their lexicon rules, replacing the k with c and inserting u in between the g and i. Thus, Kamigin became Camiguin and is still spelled in this way today.   The Untold Tales of Camiguin by Andres Narros Lluch   In his book The Untold Stories of Camiguin Island which was recently launched by the Xavier University Press, Lluch aims to introduce Camiguingnons and scholars of the island’s  history  to some missing chapters of its past. “Many of the stories of the island of Camiguin remain untold. And once one goes into the depths of search, he/she can easily understand the reasons why.” He cited the eruptions of the island’s volcanoes, the loss of many written manuscripts to fire, and the archaic language in which the few surviving manuscripts are written among the key reasons why many chapters of its history remain undiscovered. 1952 Mt Hibok-Hibok eruption (The Illustrated London News, 12 January 1952)   “The combination of these factors resulted in the obvious chasm/gaps between the locals and their past. For all of these reasons, investigating Camiguin Island is not only a fascinating research subject with a high dose of historical vertigo, but significant to the community in understanding its past.” “As a result of all these there is a break in the Camiguingnons’ relationship with their past. A painful break, one that bleeds in silence.” “This book aims to heal that wound, at least in part. And it does so by building up a story based on an extensive process of ethno-historical research that includes within it fictional micro-tales among its protagonists.” This is the first book that documents and surfaces oral history while looking at how it intertwines with the archives manuscripts. It was not deliberate it was just a process that unfolded naturally, driven by my personal curiosity, he adds.   Libro de Cosas Notables, Parroquia de Sagay, Isla de Camiguin, Provincia de Misamis   He gathered local histories from the island’s indigenous peoples, then compared these with the manuscripts written by the  Spanish Augustinian Recollects called Cosas Notables written in archaic Castellano which proved difficult to translate. Most of the findings herein are credited to Father Calisto Gaspar. During his time as parish priest in Catarman (1884-1898), he worked hard in order to rescue lost stories (through interviews of elders, informal group discussions, readings) and to bring to light what he called the “dark tunnel of the History of Camiguin.”   Datu Migin (By Melissa Abuga-a)   However, he found many parallels between the old tales and the written records. As the first and only research based on the archives of the Augustinian Recollects in Camiguin, Lluch focused each chapter on an important historical event few Camiguingnons and scholars are aware of such as Kimigin (about the first inhabitants of the island, the Manobo, the followers of Datu Migin); Punta Pasil (the first Christian religious center on the island);  Datu Mehong the legend of a local leader, healer and warrior whose message was silenced); and  The Old Volcano (what happened before and after the 1871 volcanic eruption).   Dr. Andrés Narros Lluch   Lluch co-founded the Kilaha Foundation in 2015 to document and support local culture and identity, as well as preserve the fascinating biodiversity of Camiguin. He is currently an affiliated researcher at Research Institute of Mindanao Culture (RIMCU) at Xavier University (Ateneo de Cagayan). Lluch earned his PhD in Social and Cultural Anthropology from the Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED). He has done field work as an aid worker and social researcher in Southeast Asia, Central Asia, Central America, South America, East Africa, and Europe for twenty years. He belonged to the Southeast Asia Department at the School of Oriental and African Studies (2011–2012), was guest researcher in the Department of Anthropology at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and associate researcher in the Department of Anthropology at the University of the Philippines Manila (2012–2014). Lluch has previously published the book La comedia de la cooperación internacional: historias etnográficas del desarrollo en la isla de Camiguín (Catarata, 2016) and currently alternates between Spain and Brussels, where he works at ODS as Senior Evaluator. More details about The Untold Stories of Camiguin Island from the Xavier University webpage here.

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Viva's Bella Bandida to premier November 25

November 10, 2020

A new icon for women empowerment is coming to mainstream television!   From the producer of astounding movies “BuyBust” and “Maria”, “Bella Bandida”, an action-drama series loosely based on the comic book by National Artist Francisco V. Coching, is set to premiere on TV5 on November 25, 2020.   Ryza Cenon portrays the role of Annabelle “Bella” Suarez, a medical doctor who aims to help improve the welfare of the people of Santiago, her hometown.  Her boyfriend, town councilor Brick Ortaleza (Josef Elizalde), also intends to change the corrupt political system as he is being groomed to be the next mayor.   At present, the town of Santiago is under the governance of Timothy Gregory Ortaleza, a.k.a  “Mayor Tigro” (Efren Reyes, Jr.).  When Bella finds out that he is authorizing a mining operation, she bravely confronts him about it since she knows the bad effect it could bring to the town, most especially the tribe where she belongs.    But Bella ends up getting raped.  The culprit is the mayor himself, along with Santiago’s chief of police, Col. Emmanuel Barbaro (Lito Pimentel), and one highly skilled assassin named El Pistulero (Rafa Siguion-Reyna).  Mayor Tigro even wants her dead, but his murder attempt fails.    Bella is saved by a rebel named Chris (AJ Muhlach), but more than that, a higher power gives her a second life. May’ari, the goddess of moon and night, endows her with super powers.  Bella Bandida is born.   With revenge on top of her mind, Bella Bandida hunts the people that wronged her.  Chris supports her in this endeavor.  But in the process of exacting her revenge, she discovers much deeper societal issues.  Bella Bandida uses her powers to fight against the injustices in Santiago.   “Bella Bandida” is Ryza Cenon’s first title role.  In the last four years, Ryza has portrayed strong characters such as Georgia Ferrer on “Ika-6 na Utos” (GMA-7), Aubrey Hidalgo on “FPJ’s Ang Probinsyano”, and Jessie de Leon-del Fierro on “The General’s Daughter” (ABS-CBN).  From Kapuso Network to Kapamilya Network, and now on Kapatid Network, Ryza is all set to make a mark as one of the few female action heroes on Philippine TV.   “Bella Bandida” also stars Sarah Jane Abad as Rhoda Velasquez, a family friend of the Ortalezas who will fall in love with Brick when Bella disappears.  Ara Mina takes on an important role in Bella’s life and the town of Santiago.    Director Raffy Francisco, after enjoying a tremendous success in creative TV commercials and music videos, proudly announces on his Instagram that this is his “first foray into long-form narratives”.   Co-directing with him is Temi Abad, a prolific writer and creative consultant.      Follow the story of “Bella Bandida” and see why she is not a girl to be messed with.     

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Promo Alert: Yellow Cab’s Wing It With Darla

November 9, 2020

In case you missed it, our signature Dear Darla® is back and she’s brought with her FREE WINGS. The original Yellow Cab favorite is making a comeback with a very scrumptious deal!  From November 9 to 15, 2020, get 4pcs. of wings for FREE when you purchase any 9-inch Dear Darla® specialty hand-rolled pizza! Choose between our Original Darla or Roasted Garlic & Ricotta pizzas, and pair it with our juicy, crispy wings in Hot Chix, Sweet Soy, Garlic Parmesan, or Sriracha – everything starting at P420 only.  This limited time offer is available in participating Yellow Cab stores nationwide for dine in, Curbside® pick-up, take-out, and delivery. This is also available via GrabFood, foodpanda, and LalaFood.  All Yellow Cab stores comply with proper operating guidelines to ensure you get our signature products as safely as possible. Stay safe!  For more information, visit https://www.facebook.com/YellowCabPizzaOfficial.

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